Cultural Dynamics: Happy Staff, Healthy Sales


Dan DiSano has been President and CEO of Axispoint since June 2002. He served on President Obama’s Transition Team as a member of Technology, Innovation and Government Reform. The IT solutions provider has been on CRN's Fast Growth 100 list three times (2007-2009), and this year, with 47 percent two-year growth, the $44 million company is on our Fast Growth Up and Comers list. — Jennifer D. Bosavage, editor

Having a positive culture that works for your organization is critical to your company’s success. Vision and strategy are incredibly important, but without a culture that works, even the best strategies can fail.

I believe business success is driven by a few key variables, none of which is more important than execution. You can devise a sound and inspiring vision and an intelligent and robust strategy, yet without the right execution, those visions will be mere words and strategies will die on the vine. The combination of culture and execution is what truly drives success.

[Related: MicroTech CEO Tony Jimenez: Clarifying Cloud
]

If you have a culture of execution (and again, what you’re executing upon will be different based on your charge, behaviors and principles), you will have the best opportunity to meet your organization’s objectives and most likely have fun in the process. Don’t discount happiness, as I’m a believer that the more excited, interested, passionate and yes, happy, your team is, the more productive your organization will be , although I have seen a few exceptions to this rule.

One other aspect I have witnessed first-hand that can greatly help drive your culture and execution is accountability. Organizations can vary how they parse accountability (by person, team, company, combinations thereof), but having real ownership and accountability over an area, work flow, process, system, project (whatever it may be) can provide the necessary empowerment and measured results to assist in execution.

I have seen organizations with lack of accountability have real issues with driving results because teammates can flounder and are simply lost. The best organizations seem to have a strong yet simple vision, excellent strategy and objectives, a real culture of execution with teammate accountability and empowerment, and often have fun on the journey.