CRN Applications and OS News


  • Category: Business Software
    Best of the Midmarket, Business Software, Business Objects Crystal Vision Server, FrontRange GoldMine 7.03 Corporate Edition, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Oracle JD Edwards Enterprise One, WebTrends Analytics 8
  • Letters: Linux, Love It Or Hate It
    Frank Ohlhorst's recent column, "A Linux OS For All," asked readers what needed to be done for Linux to gain more traction. And, boy, did they have a lot to say about Linux.
  • Analysts: Mercury Acquisition To Bolster HP Software
    Hewlett Packard's planned acquisition of Mercury Interactive for $4.5 billion will immediately give Hewlett-Packard a strong foothold in the growing areas of business optimization, application testing and performance management--spaces that IBM and CA now dominate.
  • Next Community Edition to be offered via new license that enables co-existence with third-party code.


    Scalix To Open Source E-Mail
    Scalix will offer up a good chunk of its next e-mail release to the open source world, the company said Wednesday.
  • Will rival Novell's SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop 10


    Red Hat Preps Enterprise Linux 5 Desktop
    Even as Novell shipped its new Linux desktop earlier this week, Red Hat is prepping its own corporate desktop, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 Desktop, for release by the end of 2006
  • Solution providers can now use freely available virtualization software to build affordable solutions


    Building The Ideal Virtual Desktop
    The CRN Test Center builds the ideal virtual machine with freely available software.
  • System Builder B3's Wherabouts Unknown
    Where in the world is B3 Computers? That's what officials in Marquette County, Michigan, and a host of VARs are wondering after the system builder's Web site went down and its phones were disconnected.
  • A Linux OS For All
    It is probably no surprise that I am a fan of Linux, but that does not mean I am a hater of Windows. I use Microsoft, Linux and Apple products regularly, and there are upsides and downsides to each.
  • Voice-recognition software gets amped with technology enhancements and product adaptability


    Talking Up Computing
    In the 1950s, some assumed we would be driving flying cars in 40 years' time; and in the 1960s, many thought data could be input into computers via speech by the year 2000. We are still waiting for flying cars, but the era of speaking to computers has arrived, thanks to the latest release of Dragon Naturally Speaking from Nuance Software. Now available as version 9, Dragon Naturally Speaking brings significant enhancements to the voice-recognition market, finally making the product viable for typical business use.
  • ShadowRAM: July 24
    We like free stuff as much as anybody. I mean, we really like free stuff. We have so many black pleather bags from conferences and conventions we could open a store. But we're not sure about this one: IBM's Sandy Carter was so stoked that Big Blue agreed to sponsor an "IBM Edition" of "SOA for Dummies" that, on her blog, she offered everyone free copies. After a few hours, she had gotten crushed with so many requests that she finally just pointed everybody to the Web site where they could order the book. (We took a look, on deadline, but the site was—ahem—down.)