VAR500: 20 Titans Of Transformation


Gotham Technology Group

Gotham technology group was launched in 2001 after its parent company, an application service provider, failed in the dot-com crash. The ASP model, something of a precursor to today's cloud computing, just didn't work because virtualization and multitenant technology "wasn't really there for the cloud at the time," said Gotham CEO Ira Silverman.

Montvale, N.J.-based Gotham became a leading supplier of desktop virtualization services, particularly to financial services companies, banks and insurance firms in the New York area. Gotham transformed itself into a provider of services encompassing IT infrastructure, data storage, disaster recovery, security and application development. "Desktop virtualization is a huge driver for IT infrastructure," Silverman said.

"What we always did well was this remote access part. We had to develop these other data center practices," he said. The secret? "It's hiring the right people and it's picking the right vendors to work with." While Gotham works with many IT vendors, Silverman lists Check Point, Cisco, Citrix, EMC, Microsoft and VMware as major partners. Gotham was the Citrix U.S. Partner of the Year in 2009.

"All of our customers, large or small, know that they need to do something with the cloud. But they don't know how," Silverman said. "There's a huge opportunity for us over the next five years to make money developing cloud strategies for our customers and helping them get into cloud computing. For them it's a huge challenge."

As Gotham expanded into bigger deals, it found itself running into major systems integration competitors such as CSC and IBM Global Services. In a bold move last year Gotham and six other IT consulting companies of similar size established a consortium called M7 Global Partners (M7GP.com) to bid for global virtual desktop and application delivery contracts. "That's working out exceptionally well for us," Silverman said.

By Rick Whiting

 

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