Ingram Micro Delivers IT Asset Disposition Program For VARs


Ingram Micro has launched an IT asset disposition service for U.S. solution providers, a program that cleans hard drives and properly recycles and disposes of IT hardware, according to the company.

"The greatest thing we do is arm our partners with an addressable solution for pain points in the market. A big pain point that everybody is focused on is security, including asset management and data protection. It's not just taking a hard drive to throw away or putting a desktop in a closet and forgetting about it. It's how you track data and destroy it so it's HIPAA-compliant," said Mike Humke, senior director of public sector and health-care markets at Ingram Micro.

The new IT Asset Disposition (ITAD) Services are part of the Ingram Micro Services Division’s Professional Services portfolio and offer both on-site and facility-driven removal of information from devices, including the secure transport of devices to the processing facility, Humke said.

"What we're trying to do is bring across an affordable, consistent proven solution where you don't have to hunt [for asset disposal resources]. This market is so broad and so deep and has so many compliance issues and regulatory laws that it's impossible for any one partner to do everything," Humke said.

Ingram Micro has contracted U.S. Micro as its IT asset disposal partner because it has a national reach and more than 15 years of experience in that space, said John Redman, manger of professional services at Ingram Micro.

U.S. Micro will send a technician to the site to compile an inventory of devices to be cleaned. After verifying the devices, the company runs a Department of Defense-compliant script on it to cleanse data and devices are then transported back to a U.S. Micro facility for processing.

"[U.S. Micro may use] a Brinks security truck to ensure integrity in shipping devices," Redman said. "Once it arrives in their facility it is inventoried again to confirm all devices are accounted for. Then [the devices go] through another DoD three-swipe process to ensure no data remains and it sends a validation back to the end user."

This validation includes proper documentation and certifications noting the end user’s release of liability from any unauthorized or accidental release of electronic information.

Once the devices are cleaned, U.S. Micro first seeks to refurbish or remarket them for a second life. If they are unable to be remarketed, the devices go through industrial shredders, according to Ingram Micro.

"Across the health-care and public sector, security is a top five pain point for CFOs. We have built out physical security support and have a good view of the space. We have assessment services in the network space. Now we have data security, and VARs can build out that ecosystem. It helps take them to a consultative level," said Humke.