SMB/Midmarket Opportunities


  • Bake-Off: Unified Threat Management Appliances
    You can squeeze a whole lot of security out of a good Unified Threat Management (UTM) product, because these appliances carry up to a dozen intrusion-prevention and network-protection safeguards all in one box. For the most part, solution providers like to install a UTM device at a small- to midsize-business client site and let it handle jobs typically taken on by several hardware and software solutions. ClearPointe Technology has taken that strategy and run with it.
  • Blade Server Battle Looms as SMB Market Takes Off
    With Hewlett-Packard and IBM both rolling out blade systems targeted for SMB customers, VARs are building strong demand for blade solutions among smaller customers that previously shunned the technology.
  • Raidon Makes RAID Simple
    Systems integrators have access to a wide array of RAID controllers on the market. They're fast, can support eight hard disks or more, and offer multiple RAID options. However, they're often too expensive for home offices and small businesses.
  • Three-Tiered Service
    The online data backup and storage business is booming as established storage vendors like EMC, Seagate, Symantec and others buy providers of the service, putting them in direct competition with a growing host of small businesses.
  • Distribution Shifts Gears
    Last month, some of the leading distribution executives in the channel sat down with CMP Channel editorial director and vice president Robert DeMarzo and assistant news editor Scott Campbell following the GTDC Summit in Newport Beach, Calif., to talk about how they are shaping their companies for 2008 and beyond.
  • 5 Steps For an Easy RAID 1 Setup
    Channel Test Center engineers scoured the earth for a no-frills approach to setting up a RAID array for small businesses. Here's what they came up with.
  • Open-Source Power Play
    Microsoft isn't the only company making a power play in the unified communications space. And, as usual, it finds itself facing an open-source foe.
  • Intacct SaaS Suite Slowly Lures QuickBooks Users
    Thousands of small companies run their businesses using Intuit's QuickBooks applications. But as companies grow, they often look for more scalable financial applications such as those offered by Microsoft, NetSuite and Sage. Intacct, a San Jose, Calif.-based developer of Software-as-a-Service financial management software for SMBs, is pitching itself to the channel as an alternative.
  • Make Way for Microsoft
    For all of the solution providers who've said they're taking a wait-and-see approach to Microsoft's impending unified communications blitz, the wait is almost over. Microsoft has been laying the groundwork for its march into the voice market for some time now, throwing out tantalizing tidbits along the way, including a wide-ranging partnership with Nortel Networks in July 2006 to develop integrated VoIP products as well as the release of the public beta of its Office Communications Server (OCS) 2007 in March.
  • Channel Executive Of The Year: Rauline Ochs
    Ask any Oracle channel partner what it was like to work with the software giant before 2005, and you're likely to hear angry stories of channel conflict with aggressive Oracle sales reps muscling in on resellers' deals.
  • TaaS--The New MSP
    Arnie Bellini, the CEO of ConnectWise, the Tampa, Fla.-based solution provider and maker of IT business automation software used by thousands of VARs, was a big proponent of the MSP business model long before it was fashionable.
  • Beware The Bust Out
    It's called a bustout. It's one of the most frightening"and expensive"forms of fraud in the channel, and if you're a VAR you could be a victim and not even realize it.

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