Mission Critical Applications Joining The Virtualization Party


 

Data warehousing systems have long been synonymous with physical infrastructure, but ICI's Shepard says growing adoption of cloud and mobility are prompting organizations to move them to virtual environments.

"In most data warehouse environments, there's a legacy mindset of putting big data on a large physical array and physical server. But that's going to hold back the infrastructure from evolving.

"We're getting customers to realize that through virtualization, they're not going to have to sacrifice performance -- they're actually going to gain and utilize more resources," Shepard said. "It's all about application portability and mobility, and you have to do it through virtualization."

VMware can take much of the credit for getting the industry to the halfway point in virtualized workloads, and its forthcoming release of vSphere 5 is set to blast away -- with cartoon-style force -- any remaining performance related barriers that stand in the way of running mission critical applications in the virtual environment.

"We've done a good job of taking lot of infrastructure applications and virtualizing them. Now the focus is on virtualizing tier one applications," Carl Eschenbach, VMware's president of customer operations, told CRN in June.

vSphere 5, slated for launch in the third quarter, supports virtual machines with up to 32 virtual CPUs, compared to 8 virtual CPUs in vSphere 4. vSphere 5's virtual machines can also hold up to one terabyte of virtual RAM, compared to 256 gigabytes for those of their predecessor. Despite some concerns over VMware's new vSphere licensing model, VARs are confident that any remaining virtualization stumbling blocks they'll face in the future will be psychological ones.

"vSphere 4 represented a big leap forward in terms of feature set and performance, and vSphere 5 will accelerate this even more dramatically," said Weiss.