Fujitsu Goes Multitouch With Lifebook TabletPC


Fujitsu is rolling out a tablet PC designed to take advantage of the multitouch technology to which solution providers and customers are quickly becoming accustomed.

Fujitsu's new LifeBook T5010 Tablet PC, the flagship notebook in its line of hardware, was developed with vertical markets in mind. The 13.3-inch tablet notebook comes with an optional dual digitizer that allows users to manipulate content on the screen with either a stylus or finger.

"The LifeBook T5010 TabletPC is targeted at specific verticals where users need dual functionality," said Matt McManus, vice president, channel sales, Fujitsu America. "We don't have thousands of other solution providers selling the product, which lets us deliver a better profit margin on the hardware while also selling the T5010 as part of a bigger overall solution."

Fujitsu is specifically targeting the tablet PC at verticals where having options built into the hardware is becoming increasingly important, including the first-responder and health-care markets.

The fact that the LifeBook T5010 will support multitouch technology is exciting to Justin Smith, president and COO of Brite Computers, a Rochester, N.Y.-based solution provider focused on the first-responder market.

"Most of our customers need to cruise down the road at speed and using a pen can be cumbersome," said Smith. "Finger capability is a big difference for us."

The multitouch feature also means that not all of the input that occurs on the notebook -- which can convert quickly from tablet to clamshell -- has to be done with the stylus. Law enforcement officials, for example, may be free to interact with the tablet with their fingers instead of having to stop, find the stylus and then search for information.

In addition, Fujitsu partners like Smith can use the Lifebook TabletPC as the crown jewel of a solution tailored to individual customers and designed to deliver more margin than just the money made on a hardware sale.

"The tablet, as well as communications equipment and a mount for the vehicle are all part of the solution," said Smith.

In the health-care market, the T5010 allows doctors and nurses to manipulate electronic data quickly and easily via the multitouch technology.

"Medical professionals are attracted to the LifeBook because they want quick access to the display," said Troy Okumura, senior product manager, Fujitsu America. "The dual digitizer means there is no more searching for the stylus because certain inputs can be done with a gesture."

That ability to interact with an X-ray suddenly becomes much simpler because the software allows a doctor to zoom in on a specific portion of the print in order to get a better look at a broken leg, for example.

For Smith, the hardware is designed to complement existing software, all of which makes it easier for nurses and doctors to do their jobs well while giving patients the attention they need.

"Nurses don't necessarily use keyboard and pen now," he said. "The tablet makes it easier for them to properly observe and make notes on a patient."

The Fujitsu T5010 Tablet PC comes with a wide array of options, letting the hardware be configured for the specific needs of customers. Storage on the tablet starts at 80 GB and can be customized up to 250 GB. Users have the choice of an Intel Core 2 Duo Processor and up to 4 GB of DDR3 memory.

The Fujitsu T5010 Tablet PC is available now and starts at $1,759 with an active digitizer or $1,859 with a dual digitizer.