News


  • WPA Brings Significant Improvements To WLAN Security

    Security for WLANs has taken a giant step forward with the availability of Wi-Fi Protected Access (WPA). Slated to replace the much-maligned Wired Equivalency Protocol (WEP), WPA offers stronger encryption and user-authentication features that eliminate the inherent security flaws found in WEP.

  • CRN Interview: David Wright, Legato Systems

    Only two years ago, Legato Systems reeled from shaky finances and a class-action lawsuit. But the Mountain View, Calif.-based company, under the command of Chairman and CEO David Wright for the past two years, has prospered despite the adversity. The company has remodeled itself from a developer of backup software to a provider of storage and content management solutions thanks to last year's acquisition of OTG Software. Wright recently sat down with Joseph F.

  • Federal IT Spending Will Keep Growing, But More Slowly

    The federal government will continue to increase its spending on IT security, but not at the astounding rate as in the two years following Sept. 11, 2001, according to a report released Thursday by Input, an analysis firm that serves companies doing business with the government.

  • Qwest Sales VP Leaving The Company

    A vice president at Qwest Communications International Inc. who had overseen some salespeople who inflated sales is leaving the company.

  • Microsoft To Stress iWave Products At TechEd

    Microsoft's iWave lineup, new versions of Office, SharePoint Portal Server and Visio, will take another in a series of introductory bows at TechEd in a week. And the company is expected to announce Release Candidate 1 of Exchange Server 2003, the long-awaited e-mail upgrade.

  • Intel Debuts Less-Expensive Pentium 4, Faster Chipsets

    Intel has unveiled a trio of processors and a series of chipsets designed to bring the chip maker's hyper-threading technology to a more affordable price point. In turn, computer makers such as IBM, Dell, and Gateway are promoting corporate desktops that maximize the Intel silicon.

  • Novell Sales Improve Though Company Mulls Staff Cuts

    Novell sales rebounded slightly in the second fiscal quarter of 2003, improving 0.7 percent over the previous year, while losses continued to mount, at the Provo, Utah, company. Based on ongoing sluggishness at there, Novell executives say they are considering headcount reductions and other cost savings measures to nudge the company back into the black.

  • Novell Posts $29 Million Loss

    Amid a weakened IT market, Novell posted a loss of $29 million, or 8 cents per share, on revenue of $276 million for its second fiscal quarter ended April 30.

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