McAfee Launches Upgraded Web Gateway


McAfee is attempting to combat an upsurge of Web-based malware and botnets with the release of its Web Gateway Version 7.

McAfee executives said version 7, which is currently available to resellers, enables users to more safely access a multitude of Web 2.0 applications with updated malware scanning, as well as integration with McAfee Labs' cloud-based Global Threat Intelligence network.

The Web gateway offers upgraded features, including behavioral analysis technologies designed to perform content inspection in real time for detection of malware threats, buffer overflow vulnerabilities and exploits.

Tim Roddy, McAfee senior director of product marketing for Web, mail and network DLP security, said that the product takes a hybrid approach with an updated intent-based antimalware scanning engine in combination with an array of cloud-based security technologies, making it an attractive option for MSPs in addition to traditional resellers. The product also leverages threat protection capabilities from McAfee Artemis, McAfee's reputation-based Global Threat Intelligence network, he said.

In addition, the Web gateway provides a full range of content security capabilities due to its integration with McAfee Network Data Loss Prevention and the ePolicy Orchestrator platform, Roddy added.

The upgrade also offers improved scalabilty with its additional deployment capabilities for VMware and transparent proxy options.

Roddy said that the new Web gateway is primarily targeted toward enterprises and upper midmarket segments, ideally with more than 1,000 users.

Meanwhile, McAfee executives maintained that Web-based threats— most of which are zero-day attacks — are on the rise. Malware such as Trojans are becoming more sophisticated and agile, designed to capture resources for botnets or steal personal information, customer data and intellectual property from organizations' networks.

Dan Ryan, McAfee executive vice president and general manager of the network security business unit, said that Google's Operation Aurora in January represented one such attack.

"Today's most prevalent threat to enterprises is from zero-day, Web-borne malware," Ryan said in a statement, adding that reputation management was an essential part of protection.