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ShadowRAM: July 24

We like free stuff as much as anybody. I mean, we really like free stuff. We have so many black pleather bags from conferences and conventions we could open a store. But we're not sure about this one: IBM's Sandy Carter was so stoked that Big Blue agreed to sponsor an "IBM Edition" of "SOA for Dummies" that, on her blog, she offered everyone free copies. After a few hours, she had gotten crushed with so many requests that she finally just pointed everybody to the Web site where they could order the book. (We took a look, on deadline, but the site was—ahem—down.)

Web site

Are you sick and tired of e-mail? Sun's Paul Humphreys wants to help. He's requesting input on good e-mail practices and has set up a collab space where people "can add their own bugbears, ideas on good e-mail practice, etc." Hey, how about this:

STOP SENDING ME E-MAIL ABOUT STUFF I DON'T CARE ABOUT. Oh, and enough with the interminable e-mail-thread CYAs.

Speaking of e-mail, "Daily Show" host Jon Stewart took on Alaska Sen. Ted Stevens' infamous take on the Internet-as-a-set-of-tubes. Stevens said the reason e-mail is delayed that the pipes are clogged with streaming media, music etc.

Stewart ruminated about why Stevens was having such problems: "Maybe it's because you just don't seem to know jack s**t about computers and the Internet? But hey, that's OK. You're just the guy in charge of regulating it. What difference does it make?"

Once-high-flying Yahoo hit another air pocket last week when it became public that its ballyhooed search monetization project was delayed. Yes, Project Panama is now due in the late fourth quarter vs. the third quarter. Jackson Securities downgraded Yahoo, although analyst Brian Bolan singled out Yahoo Answers for praise. Answers "showed strong growth," wrote Bolan. "Stephen Hawking and Bono have both helped stir this pot with the more active questions." Wow, talk about name-dropping.

Solution providers used to question management decisions made by former CA Chairman and CEO Charles Wang, but that's nothing compared to the grilling he's getting these days. Last week, Wang fired Neil Smith as New York Islanders' GM—40 days after hiring him—and he's set up a team board to run the hockey organization.

Appearing on "Mike and the Mad Dog" sports talk show, Wang was skewered for his NHL moves, including firing a coach in June 2003 that went on to win the Stanley Cup this year. Wang's rationale this time: He wants to try something new. "I made the decision. We're going to try a different process. Let's give it a chance, let's work on it, and hopefully we do something that's so revolutionary everybody will follow."

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