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Jim Kahle

Coaxing several processor cores to coexist in one die requires more than a strong background in engineering. Ask IBM Fellow Jim Kahle, who is credited with developing the first dual-core design, and he’ll talk about his childhood in Venezuela and dedication to soccer rather than his engineering degree.

Although Advanced Micro Devices and Intel are capturing the bulk of current media attention surrounding dual-core processors, it was IBM’s engineering team led by Kahle that laid the original foundation for the devices that solution providers applaud for their power and advancement of virtualization capabilities.

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Coaxing several processor cores to coexist in one die requires more than a strong background in engineering. Ask IBM Fellow Jim Kahle, who is credited with developing the first dual-core design, and he’ll talk about his childhood in Venezuela and dedication to soccer rather than his engineering degree.

Kahle was born in Venezuela, where his father worked in the oil business, and later moved to Indonesia before settling in New York. Kahle said learning to get along in different cultures and functioning as part of a soccer team were foundations that taught him about collaboration—within both engineering and integrated circuitry. ’I look for situations in different domains to help solve problems,’ Kahle said.

That perspective clearly has paid off. The first dual-core CPU from Kahle and his team showed up in 2001 in IBM’s high-end servers and supercomputers. Kahle has since begun tackling a nine-core design, collaborating this time with Toshiba and Sony.

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