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AIOps Provider Aisera Offers Free Aid During Coronavirus Crisis

‘First and foremost, is there something we can give back from our side, particularly to people who need the most, this is your emergency responders, our health care workers, government organizations, they need help from us so if there’s something we can do, we want to step up to the plate and offer our services free,’ says Aisera CEO Muddu Sudhakar.

Palo Alto, Calif.-based Aisera has been providing 24/7 AI technology-based assistance to health care providers and government agencies, offering its remote working virtual assistant and collaboration app free for 60 days as of March 20.

As we’re seeing this coronavirus pandemic play out on a larger scale, how is Aisera helping health care providers and government agencies manage questions and concerns during this time?

“The idea is to provide a solution so that the employees and workers, and customers and users can reach out in multiple channels. You now have social distancing, you cannot go talk [to people] person-to-person … So if you’re able to reach out on any device, any time at the time of their own need … [and] if you can provide a mechanism through which they can do their duties at their comfort level, that is the whole idea of this collaboration solution we’re offering,” Aisera CEO Muddu Sudhakar told CRN.

How does Aisera’s free offering work?

“We offer Aisera cloud service, it’s available in the cloud so it gives you scale and access of [working] remotely. It’s a SaaS service, it can be offered as an application, or a web interface up to a collaboration tool, like Slack and Microsoft Teams, where employees can, and the workers and users can, reach out and perform their questions. It could be information serving needs, or it could be something related to workflows and business process, so we want to automate anything that an employee needs, or a user needs, in a way this can be delivered and offer their services remotely,” said Sudhakar.

And as we’re seeing the use of telemedicine tools rise, what opportunity does this give users that they didn’t have before?

“In the last two weeks, we have seen the call volume of hospitals go up 200 [percent] to 300 percent in the North region [of the U.S.], same thing in L.A. It went up. So call volumes went up, the holding times are there, there’s not enough people to man the phone calls, so this is the time you want to provide access to virtual mechanisms, virtual assistance and collaboration, still getting the job done to help the consumers at the end of the day,” Sudhakar said. “So having a tool which could provide virtual assistance, collaboration, [is helpful,] and this is where the AI comes in. We actually coined a name for this, we call it, ‘conversational AI.’ Use AI for its best, this is where AI can do good for humanity.”

What’s your call to action for the industry during the coronavirus crisis?

“First and foremost, is there something we can give back from our side, particularly to people who need the most -- this is your emergency responders, our health care workers, government organizations -- they need help from us, so if there’s something we can do, we want to step up to the plate and offer our services free.”

Watch CRNtv to learn more.

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