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Samsung Powers A VR Headset That Helps The Visually Impaired To See

IrisVision mounts a Samsung Galaxy smartphone in a Samsung Gear VR headset. The software enables the visually impaired to see in real-time.

Experts say we’re in the midst of a “wearable revolution” and Samsung is urging its partners to get on-board.

“Being able to use technology to allow an end-user to not have to come into the hospital…not have to come into a doctor’s office and do a lot more monitoring at home… that’s where huge opportunities lie,” said David Kinlough, the director of B2B mobile solutions at Samsung SDS America, the developer unit of Samsung Electronics and a provider of managed services.

Juniper Research finds that about 20 percent of those 65 and older use a wearable to track their physical fitness or monitor vital signs. It forecasts that $20 billion will be spent on wearables in healthcare by 2023. Meanwhile, Best Buy plans to make health monitoring services for seniors and other digital health initiatives a key part of its growth strategy.

Partners have the opportunity to make a lot of money, said Kinlough as he showed off some of the latest innovations already on the market, like the IrisVision headset for the visually impaired.

“This is using a Samsung Galaxy device and then our partner has used a piece of software in here to shift through modes. They’ve made it so the contrast is higher…changing color palettes to make it easier for people with macular degeneration or other visual issues to see.”

The headset enables users to carry out tasks, like reading, that they would otherwise find impossible. It uses the smartphone’s camera to record a person’s surroundings. The VR headset then displays the image in real-time after the software enhanced its visibility using multiple algorithms developed for various eye conditions.

Check out CRN’s video to learn more.

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