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Gartner’s 2019 Magic Quadrant For Cloud IaaS: Six Top Providers

Check out who made Gartner’s 2019 Cloud IaaS Magic Quadrant.

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Niche Player: Oracle

Two years ago, Oracle's cloud made a debut on Gartner's Magic Quadrant as a Visionary. But last year, thanks to Gartner's modified evaluation criteria, Oracle dropped into Niche Player status, where it remains this year.

Oracle Cloud Infrastructure, or OCI, was a second-generation service launched in 2016 to phase out the legacy offering, now referred to as Oracle Cloud Infrastructure Classic.

The cloud offers both virtualized and bare-metal servers, with one-click installation and configuration of Oracle databases and container services.

OCI appeals to customers with Oracle workloads that don't need more than basic IaaS capabilities.

"OCI is best suited for enterprises requiring cloud IaaS for Oracle applications and for applications that require an Oracle Database," Gartner said.

Strengths:

The tech giant's cloud strategy relies on its applications, database and middleware, and spans the stack, from IaaS to PaaS to SaaS.

"Oracle’s cloud IaaS is primarily an infrastructure foundation for its other businesses," Gartner noted. "Oracle is mainly targeting customers who want to run Oracle software on cloud IaaS, particularly those who prefer to run on Exadata appliances and bare-metal servers."

Oracle has done a good job of attracting talent from other cloud providers to build well-designed infrastructure. It's also seen good progress in winning new customers, and getting existing ones to use more OCI.

Cautions:

Gartner said it’s unlikely Oracle will ever be seen as a general-purpose provider of integrated IaaS and PaaS because of the dominance of the hyper-scale powerhouses and Oracle's late entry into the market.

Oracle's "polarizing nature" with developers can also be a problem, as they are the ones who often influence decisions around public cloud adoption.

"Many features developed for OCI will not be extensively used by Oracle’s core customer base as the company is building capabilities mainly in response to RFPs, which are often designed around the capabilities of the established hyperscale providers," Gartner said.

 
 
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