Advertisement

Components peripherals News

Intel CEO Pat Gelsinger On Foundry Plans, Chip Roadmaps And Mobileye’s IPO

Joseph F. Kovar

‘Supply chain lockdowns in Shanghai and the war in Ukraine have demonstrated more than ever that the world needs more resilient and more geographically balanced semiconductor manufacturing. The chips shortage cost the US economy $240 billion last year. And we expect the industry will continue to see challenges until at least 2024 in areas like foundry capacity and tool availability,’ says Intel CEO Pat Gelsinger.

One Quarter Down, So Much More On The Horizon

Intel Thursday reported its first fiscal quarter 2022 financials, with revenue of $18.4 billion down 7 percent compared to last year, but with GAAP net income up 141 percent compared to a 35-percent drop in non-GAAP net income. That drop in revenue was caused primarily by a 13-percent slowdown in Intel’s client computing business, which accounts for slightly over 50 percent of total revenue, while all the other parts of the business grew well.

While investors saw the numbers as a reason to push Intel’s share prices down by nearly 7 percent on Friday, Intel CEO Pat Gelsinger saw the numbers as vindication of Intel’s strategy to take market share and build for the future, including its upcoming massive investment in foundry services.

Santa Clara, Calif.-based Intel has a long-term growth strategy to unlock a trillion-dollar market opportunity around four key pillars, Gelsinger told financial analysts on the conference call.

“We will deliver leadership products anchored on open and secure platforms powered by at-scale manufacturing and supercharged by our people,” he said. “In Q1, we made great progress on all of these areas, and we are continuing to hold our full-year revenue outlook.”

Intel has been busy introducing new processors, GPUs, and other semiconductors and related software, all with an eye towards the future, including a future where half the world’s semiconductor manufacturing will be in North America and Europe as a way to prevent shortages in the world, Gelsinger said.

“Overall, Q1 was a great start to the year as we continue to execute on a path to our long-term growth story,” he said. We still have a lot of work to do, but we are executing at a torrid pace, and I remain confident in our path forward.”

Gelsinger also said the first fiscal quarter 2022 is the first for Intel to report based on its June 2022 move to reorganize its business into six new business groups, including CCG (Intel Client Group), DCAI (Intel Datacenter And AI Group), NEX (Intel Network And Edge Group), AXG (Intel Accelerated Computing Systems And Graphics Group), IFS (Intel Foundry Services), and MBLY (Intel Mobileye).

For a look at how Intel is executing against its plans, click through the slideshow.

 
Joseph F. Kovar

Joseph F. Kovar is a senior editor and reporter for the storage and the non-tech-focused channel beats for CRN. He keeps readers abreast of the latest issues related to such areas as data life-cycle, business continuity and disaster recovery, and data centers, along with related services and software, while highlighting some of the key trends that impact the IT channel overall. He can be reached at jkovar@thechannelcompany.com.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Sponsored Post
Advertisement
Advertisement