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Observe Exits Stealth; Targets Splunk, Datadog For Observability: CEO Jeremy Burton

‘These systems have gotten so complex. And so we thought, there’s got to be a way to solve that problem. There has to be a way of looking at all of the data that the applications and the infrastructure emits. There’s got to be a way to figure out what’s going on,’ says Observe CEO Jeremy Burton.

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But isn't this something that a lot of companies are already doing?

For sure. You’ve got the typical vendors like Splunk, Datadog and New Relic. And these are probably the leaders in the space. But you’ll find in each of these areas there’s probably another five or 10 companies, and all of these guys, and I suspect many others as well, are headed towards this direction of observability. And, they know that observability isn’t just looking myopically at one kind of data. It’s really looking at everything together. ...

Splunk is like, yeah, we’re looking at logs today, and we really need to get better at metrics and tracing, so we’ll go buy up a company. So they spent a billion dollars on SignalFx, and they bought a small company called Omnition.

Datadog, 99 percent of its revenue is metrics, and they acquired a company called Logmatic.io, and then they’re pulling in an open-source APM [application performance management] project. And the one big company that’s I think trying to do it maybe the original and perhaps the best way is New Relic, which has an entirely new product line called New Relic One focused on this observability space. So the big guys are certainly moving in that direction. And certainly anyone getting into this area is really counting on the fact that you’ve got to consolidate data.

What’s unique about Observe?

We store all of the data in a commercial database called Snowflake. Almost all other vendors in the space have all created their own proprietary database.

We had a couple of founders from Snowflake on the team, so we were obviously pretty motivated to take a look at that. And so we take all of these various different kinds of data and put it in Snowflake. And I believe it’s the first commercial database that is actually able to handle all of those data types. And for us, I think that is going to prove to be a big advantage because we don’t have half the team working on building a database. We’ve got 300-plus engineers at Snowflake doing that. ...

What you’re going to see over the next few years is a whole ecosystem of companies building on top of Snowflake. Our specific use case is one. But I think you’re going to see security companies, business intelligence companies, a whole host of companies realizing that, ’Yeah, we don’t need to build our own. We can go with a commercial offering.’

 
 
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